Nonimmigrant Visas

What Does the USCIS Case Status “Case Approved” Mean for My Form I-539: Application To Change or Extend Nonimmigrant Status?

Written by Paige Hooper
Written January 6, 2023

If your USCIS case status says “Case Was Approved,” congratulations! This means USCIS has reviewed your application, determined your eligibility, and decided to grant your Form I-539 application. You’ll often see several statuses prior to approval as your case progresses, and it can take a long time for USCIS to process and approve your application. It takes an average of 4-10 months for USCIS to process and approve Form I-539 requests. This article explains the case approval process with USCIS and what happens after your case is approved.

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What Does the USCIS Case Status “Case Transferred” Mean for My Form I-539 Application?

Written by ImmigrationHelp Team
Written December 20, 2022

The U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) case status “Case Was Transferred And A New Office Has Jurisdiction” means that USCIS moved your case to a different service center or field office. The new office will continue processing your case from there. USCIS may choose to transfer your Form I-539 application for several reasons, including staffing shortages or processing delays. Cases may also be transferred if you, the applicant, move and are now in a new jurisdiction. If USCIS transfers your case, it will notify you via your online account and mail you a transfer notice. You don’t need to do anything, but take note that any future additional documentation for your case and any questions you have about your case will need to be directed to the new office.

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What Does the USCIS Case Status “Case Was Received” Mean for My Form I-539 Application?

Written by Kassandra Kuehl
Written December 15, 2022

When you see the case status “Case Was Received” from U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS), it means USCIS is acknowledging that it received your I-539 application. This is just the start of USCIS processing your case. The agency hasn’t yet reviewed your application materials or determined your eligibility. Once you see this status, you’ll want to keep an eye on future status changes and respond to anything that requires your attention, such as a request for evidence. This article explains the “Case Received” USCIS status and what to do when your application is in this status.

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What Does the USCIS Case Status “Case Was Denied” Mean for My Form I-539 Application?

Written by Kassandra Kuehl
Written December 15, 2022

If you see “Case Was Denied” as your USCIS case status online, it means that U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) has received and reviewed your Form I-539 application and decided not to grant you a change or extension of your nonimmigration status. If USCIS denies your Form I-539 case, it will send you a denial notice explaining why. It can be disheartening to go through months of processing for a change or extension of your nonimmigrant status only to have your case denied. If this happens, you may want to get legal advice about the next steps. If you decide to appeal your case, we can connect you with an independent attorney through our Ask an Attorney program.

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What Does the USCIS Case Status “Request for Additional Evidence Was Sent” Mean for My Form I-539 Application?

Written by ImmigrationHelp Team
Written December 10, 2022

If you log in to your USCIS account online and see the case status “Request for Additional Evidence Was Sent,” it means that USCIS needs more information from you to process your case and ensure you’re eligible for the immigration benefit you applied for. USCIS will mail a Form I-797E: Notice of Action that outlines exactly what additional evidence is needed and why. The notice will also include a deadline for submitting the requested information. It’s important to submit the requested information before the deadline to ensure USCIS continues processing your application without too much delay.

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What Does the USCIS Case Status “Case Rejected” Mean for My Form I-539 Application?

Written by ImmigrationHelp Team
Written November 8, 2022

The USCIS case status “Case Rejected” means that you didn’t file your immigration paperwork correctly, so USCIS did not review your case. If U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) rejects your case, it will return your original filing fee. To have your case reviewed, you’ll need to fix the issue that caused the rejection. Common issues that lead to rejection include filing the incorrect form version, paying an incorrect fee amount, and not signing a form. If you see the “Case Rejected” status on your USCIS account, you’ll need to refile your application and pay your filing fee to move forward with your immigration application. If you aren’t sure how to correct the mistake after reading this article, you may want to contact an attorney for help with your case. We can refer you to an experienced immigration attorney for a free consultation.

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A Guide to the M-1 Visa for Vocational Students

Written by Jonathan Petts
Updated July 6, 2022

There are different visa categories for foreign students who wish to pursue an education in the United States. If you would like to receive vocational training in the United States, you may be able to do so with an M-1 visa if you can meet the requirements. This article explains what the M-1 visa is, who can apply for it, and how to apply. It also answers some frequently asked questions about the student visa.

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Keeping You Out of the United States: Grounds for Inadmissibility

Written by Jonathan Petts

The U.S. has special laws that dictate who may enter or stay in the country. These laws list reasons you may be barred from entering the country as an immigrant. If you’re already in the U.S., these laws may allow you to be deported. These reasons are often referred to as “grounds for inadmissibility,” and many exist. But even if one or more grounds for inadmissibility apply to you, you can still stay or enter the U.S. in certain situations. This article provides an overview of the grounds for inadmissibility. It also discusses exceptions and waivers to inadmissibility.

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How To Change Your Status From a J-1 Visa to a Marriage Green Card

Written by Jonathan Petts
Written May 25, 2022

Many Americans and lawful permanent residents are married to foreign citizens. As a student exchange visitor on a J-1 visa, it's possible to meet and fall in love with a U.S. citizen or permanent resident during your time in the United States. If you marry someone who's a U.S. citizen or green cardholder, you can get a green card. In this article, we explain what the marriage green card process is like depending on your spouse's U.S. immigration status, and whether or not you've overstayed your visa. We'll also discuss some things you should consider before filing your application, like the home residency requirement and the 90-day rule.

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