ImmigrationHelp Team

ImmigrationHelp Team


Articles written by ImmigrationHelp Team

What Does the USCIS Case Status “Case Was Received” Mean for My Employment Green Card?

Written by ImmigrationHelp Team

When you see the case status “Case Was Received” from U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS), it means USCIS is acknowledging that it received your immigration application packet. This is just the start of USCIS processing your application. It hasn’t yet reviewed your application materials or determined your eligibility. Once you see this status, you’ll want to keep an eye on future status changes and respond to anything that requires your attention, such as a request for evidence. This article explains the “Case Received” USCIS status and what to do when your application is in this status.

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What Does the USCIS Case Status “Request for Additional Evidence Was Sent” Mean for My Work Permit Application?

Written by ImmigrationHelp Team

If you log in to your USCIS account online and see the case status “Request for Additional Evidence Was Sent,” it means that USCIS needs more information from you to process your Form I-765 and ensure you’re eligible for a work permit. USCIS will mail a Form I-797E: Notice of Action that outlines exactly what additional evidence is needed and why. The notice will also include a deadline for submitting the requested information. It’s important to submit the requested information before the deadline to ensure USCIS continues processing your application without too much delay.

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What Does the USCIS Case Status “Case Was Received” Mean for My Form I-765 Application?

Written by ImmigrationHelp Team

When you see the case status “Case Was Received” from U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS), USCIS is acknowledging that it received your immigration application packet. This is just the start of USCIS processing your application. USCIS hasn’t yet reviewed your application materials or determined your eligibility. Once you see this status, you’ll want to keep an eye on future status changes and respond to anything that requires your attention, such as a request for evidence. This article explains the “Case Received” USCIS status and what to do when your application is in this status.

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How To Find Your Priority Date With Form I-797: Notice of Action

Written by ImmigrationHelp Team

The two most common paths to getting a green card are being sponsored by an immediate family member who is a U.S. citizen or lawful permanent resident and being sponsored by a U.S. employer. Your family relationship or employment situation will determine your priority in getting a green card since the number of green cards is limited. Often, after your family member or employer submits the initial petition, you’ll be put on a waiting list, and your immigration process will be put on hold until a green card becomes available. Your place on this waiting list is determined by your priority date. You can typically find your priority date on Form I-797: Notice of Action that U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) sends you after they receive a properly filed immigration petition or application.

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What Does the USCIS Case Status “Case Was Denied” Mean for My Employment-Based Green Card Application?

Written by ImmigrationHelp Team

If you see “Case Was Denied” as your USCIS case status online, it means that U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services has received and reviewed your employment-based green card case and decided not to grant you a green card. If USCIS denies your employment-based green card, it will send you a denial notice explaining why. It can be disheartening to go through months of processing for an employment-based green card only to have your case denied. If this happens, you may want to get legal advice about the next steps. If you decide to appeal your case, you’ll want to have a good immigration attorney at your side.

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What Does USCIS Case Status “Case Rejected” Mean for My Employment-Based Green Card?

Written by ImmigrationHelp Team

The USCIS case status “Case Rejected” means that you didn’t file your immigration paperwork correctly, so USCIS did not review your case. If USCIS rejects your case, it will return your original filing fee. To have your case reviewed, you’ll need to fix the issue that caused the rejection. Common issues that lead to rejection include filing the incorrect form version, paying an incorrect fee amount, and not signing a form. If you see the “Case Rejected” status on your USCIS account, you’ll need to refile your application and pay your filing fee to move forward with your immigration application. If you aren’t sure how to correct the mistake after reading this article, you may want to contact an attorney for help with your case.

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What Is an Immigrant Visa Number and How Can I Get One?

Written by ImmigrationHelp Team

U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) or the National Visa Center (NVC) issues immigrant visa numbers to green card applicants after the petitioner successfully submits Form I-130 or Form I-140 and once there is a visa available. There are caps on the number of people who can get an immigrant visa each year. So even if you have met all of the eligibility requirements to get a permanent visa, become a lawful permanent resident, and get your green card, you may still have to wait a long time before you get your immigrant visa number and can proceed with the immigrant visa process to get your green card. This article explains immigrant visa numbers and how they differ from your Alien Registration Number (A-Number) and your USCIS case number.

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What Is USCIS Form I-797: Notice of Action?

Written by Jonathan PettsLegally reviewed by ImmigrationHelp Team

The U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) Form I-797: Notice of Action serves several purposes. If you file an application with USCIS, the agency will send you Form I-797: Notice of Action to inform you that it has received your application. This is often called a receipt notice. It’s also commonly used as a way to communicate that USCIS has approved your immigrant or nonimmigrant application. While these are common uses of Form I-797, USCIS also uses Form I-797 to notify you of case status changes. These notices have a letter at the end of the form name, such as Form I-797C, and each form provides information regarding the status of your application. In this article, we explain each of the uses of Form I-797.

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What Does the USCIS Case Status “Case Was Denied” Mean for My EB-5 Application?

Written by ImmigrationHelp Team

If you see “Case Was Denied” as your USCIS case status online, it means that U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services has received and reviewed your EB-5 application and decided not to grant you a green card. If USCIS denies your EB-5 case, it will send you a denial notice explaining why. It can be disheartening to go through months of processing for an EB-5 green card only to have your case denied. If this happens, you may want to get legal advice about the next steps. If you decide to appeal your case, you’ll want to have a good immigration attorney at your side.

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How Long Does It Take USCIS To Process Marriage Green Cards for a Spouse Abroad?

Written by Jonathan PettsLegally reviewed by ImmigrationHelp Team

As the petitioner for your foreign spouse, you’ll file Form I-130: Petition for Alien Relative with U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS). It’s currently taking between 12.5 to 36.5 months for USCIS to process Form I-130 for U.S. citizenship petitioners and 14.5 to 46 months for permanent resident petitioners. As the beneficiary, your spouse will file Form DS-260 with the National Visa Center. The current NVC timeframe for creating and reviewing cases is 34 days, which is down 30 days from last week.

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Step-by-Step Guide To Filing a Family Green Card Application Concurrently

Written by ImmigrationHelp Team

Filing for a family green card concurrently means you file Form I-130 and Form I-485 at the same time. These two forms will be accompanied by other required (and optional) forms plus required filing fees to form your green card application or petition. Most concurrent family green card applications take 7-15 months and cost $1,760.

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What Is DACA, and How Do You Apply?

Written by ImmigrationHelp Team

The Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) provides relief from deportation for eligible young immigrants who are documented and living in the United States. DACA recipients can get Social Security cards and work permits that they can renew every two years. ImmigrationHelp.org is a non-profit that helps eligible DACA applicants to get their initial and renewal application paperwork together for free. This article explains all you need to know about the DACA program, including its history and purpose, who can apply for it, and how to apply if it's your first time or if you're renewing your status.

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How To File a Family Green Card Application Non-Concurrently: A Step-by-Step Guide

Written by ImmigrationHelp Team

When you file for a family green card non-concurrently, an eligible family member petitions for you with Form I-130 and you file Form I-485 at a different time. Because you are submitting the forms at different times, this process will take longer than filing concurrently — or submitting your Form I-130 and I-485 at the same time. This article outlines the 13 steps of filing for a family green card non-concurrently.

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What Does the USCIS Case Status “Request for Additional Evidence Was Sent” Mean for My Form N-400?

Written by ImmigrationHelp Team

If you log in to your USCIS account online and see the case status “Request for Additional Evidence Was Sent,” it means that USCIS needs more information from you to process your Form N-400 and ensure you’re eligible for U.S. citizenship. USCIS will mail a Form I-797E: Notice of Action that outlines exactly what additional evidence is needed and why. The notice will also include a deadline for submitting the requested information. It’s important to submit the requested information before the deadline to ensure USCIS continues processing your application without too much delay.

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DACA Processing Times: How Long Does It Take USCIS To Process DACA Applications?

Written by ImmigrationHelp Team

The Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program protects eligible undocumented young people in the U.S. from deportation, but it does not confer legal status. DACA recipients are eligible to apply for work authorization, or a work permit, so they can legally work in the United States. DACA status is valid for two years. Recipients may reapply every two years to renew their status and work authorization. The DACA program is being challenged in federal court, so the U.S. government is accepting, but not currently processing, initial DACA applications. This article lists the current case processing times for the two main DACA forms — Form I-821D: Consideration of Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals and Form I-765: Application for Employment Authorization Document, as well as the accompanying worksheet Form I-765WS. It also lists the case processing times for the Advance Parole application Form I-130, which many DACA recipients file.

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Step-by-Step Guide To Filing a Family Green Card Application From Abroad (by Consular Processing)

Written by ImmigrationHelp Team

If you are a lawful permanent resident or U.S. citizen and you want to petition for a family member to get a green card, you’ll apply through consular processing. This process means you’ll interact with U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) and the National Visa Center (NVC). This process typically takes 7–15 months and costs $1,400. This is a 14-step guide to getting a family green card through consular processing.

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What Does the USCIS Case Status “Case Approved” Mean for My VAWA Green Card Application?

Written by ImmigrationHelp Team

If your U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) case status says “Case Was Approved,” congratulations! This means USCIS has reviewed your application, determined your eligibility, and decided to grant your Violence Against Women Act (VAWA) green card. You’ll often see several statuses prior to approval as your case progresses, and it can take a long time for USCIS to process and approve your application. It takes an average of 15–40 months (or about 1–3 years) for USCIS to process and approve VAWA green cards. This article explains the case approval process with USCIS and what happens after your case is approved.

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What Does the USCIS Case Status “Case Transferred” Mean for My VAWA Application?

Written by ImmigrationHelp Team

The U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) case status “Case Was Transferred And A New Office Has Jurisdiction” means that USCIS moved your case to a different service center or field office. The new office will continue processing your case from there. USCIS may choose to transfer your Violence Against Women Act (VAWA) case for several reasons, including staffing shortages or processing delays. Cases may also be transferred if you, the applicant, move and are now in a new jurisdiction. If USCIS transfers your case, it will notify you via your online account and mail you a transfer notice. You don’t need to do anything, but take note that any future additional documentation for your case and any questions you have about your case will need to be directed to the new office.

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What Does the USCIS Case Status “Case Was Denied” Mean for My VAWA Application?

Written by ImmigrationHelp Team

If you see “Case Was Denied” as your USCIS case status online, it means that U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) has received and reviewed your Violence Against Women Act (VAWA) application and decided not to grant you a green card. If USCIS denies your VAWA case, it will send you a denial notice in the mail explaining why. It can be disheartening to go through months of processing for a VAWA green card only to have your case denied. If this happens, you may want to get legal advice about the next steps. If you decide to appeal your case, we can refer you to a good immigration attorney for help.

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What Does the USCIS Case Status “Case Rejected” Mean for My Citizenship Application?

Written by ImmigrationHelp Team

The USCIS case status “Case Rejected” means that you didn’t file your immigration paperwork correctly, so USCIS did not review your case. If USCIS rejects your case, it will return your original filing fee. To have your case reviewed, you’ll need to fix the issue that caused the rejection. Common issues that lead to rejection include filing the incorrect form version, paying an incorrect fee amount, and not signing a form. If you see the “Case Rejected” status on your USCIS account, you’ll need to refile your application and pay your filing fee to move forward with your immigration application. If you aren’t sure how to correct the mistake after reading this article, you may want to contact an attorney for help with your case.

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What Does the USCIS Case Status “Case Rejected” Mean for My EB-5 Green Card Application?

Written by ImmigrationHelp Team

The USCIS case status “Case Rejected” means that you didn’t file your immigration paperwork correctly, so USCIS did not review your case. If USCIS rejects your case, it will return your original filing fee. To have your case reviewed, you’ll need to fix the issue that caused the rejection. Common issues that lead to rejection include filing the incorrect form version, paying an incorrect fee amount, and not signing a form. If you see the “Case Rejected” status on your USCIS account, you’ll need to refile your application and pay your filing fee to move forward with your immigration application. If you aren’t sure how to correct the mistake after reading this article, you may want to contact an attorney for help with your case.

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How To Get a U.S. Marriage Green Card: A Step-by-Step Guide

Written by ImmigrationHelp Team

A marriage green card is a type of immigrant visa that allows you to live and work in the United States. It is available to the spouses of U.S. citizens or green card holders. Applying for a marriage green card takes 9–38 months and costs $1,400–$1,960. You can apply for a marriage green card from inside the U.S. or from abroad. This guide explains what a marriage green card is and how to get one.

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